It’s raining cats and dogs (hopefully)

It’s raining cats and dogs (hopefully)

In April 2017, I presented an ASA K-12 statistics education webinar: Statistical reasoning with data cards (webinar). Towards the end of the webinar, I encouraged teachers to get students to make their own data cards about their cats. A few days later,

Which one doesn’t belong …. for stats?

Which one doesn’t belong …. for stats?

If you haven’t heard of the activity Which one doesn’t belong? (WODB), it involves showing students four “things” and asking them to describe/argue which one doesn’t belong. There are heaps of examples of Which one doesn’t belong? in action for math(s) on the

Statistical reasoning with data cards (webinar)

Statistical reasoning with data cards (webinar)

UPDATE: The video of the webinar is now available here. I’m super excited to be presenting the next ASA K-12 Statistics Education Webinar. The webinar is based on one of my sessions from last year’s Meeting Within a Meeting (MWM) and will

Initial adventures in Stickland

Initial adventures in Stickland

This post provides the notes for a workshop I ran at the Otago Mathematics Association (OMA) Conference about using data challenges to encourage statistical thinking. Until last week, I had never re-presented or adapted a workshop that I had developed in

Welcome to stickland!

Welcome to stickland!

I’ve been working on a little side project for the last year or so. I thought this might be a good time to share this with you, particularly since I probably (with a very high probability) won’t be making any

Statistics flowers (data cards)

Statistics flowers (data cards)

Inspired by Fisher’s Iris data, this sample of flowers was created through simulation from a carefully designed model. From a student’s perspective, these flowers represent a random sample of flowers from a much bigger population of statistics flowers. The idea is that students

Census at school stick people (data cards)

Census at school stick people (data cards)

This population of stick people was created using data from the Census at School 2015 database. For the data cards, rather than put/indicate gender on the card I have used a fictional name, taken from the names of children entered in the