Different strokes?

Recently I’ve been developing and trialling learning tasks where the learner is working with a provided data set but has to do something “human” that motivates using a random sample as part of the strategy to learn something from the data.

Since I already had a tool that creates data cards from the Quick, Draw! data set, I’ve created a prototype for the kind of tool that would support this approach using the same data set.

I’ve written about the Quick, Draw! data set already:

For this new tool, called different strokes, users sort drawings into two or more groups based on something visible in the drawing itself. Since you have the drag the drawings around to manually “classify” them, the larger the sample you take, the longer it will take you.

There’s also the novelty and creativity of being able to create your own rules for classifying drawings. I’ll use cats for the example below, but from a teaching and assessment perspective there are SO many drawings of so many things and so many variables with so many opportunities to compare and contrast what can be learned about how people draw in the Quick, Draw!

Here’s a precis of the kinds of questions I might ask myself to explore the general question What can we learn from the data about how people draw cats in the Quick, Draw! game?

  • Are drawings of cats more likely to be heads only or the whole body? [I can take a sample of cat drawings, and then sort the drawings into heads vs bodies. From here, I could bootstrap a confidence interval for the population proportion].
  • Is how someone draws a cat linked to the game time? [I can use the same data as above, but compare game times by the two groups I’ve created – head vs bodies. I could bootstrap a confidence interval for the difference of two population means/medians]
  • Is there a relationship between the number of strokes and the pause time for cat drawings? [And what do these two variables actually measure – I’ll need some contextual knowledge!]
  • Do people draw dogs similarly to cats in the Quick, Draw! game? [I could grab new samples of cat and dog drawings, sort all drawings into “heads” or “bodies”, and then bootstrap a confidence interval for the difference of two population proportions]

Check out the tool and explore for yourself here: http://learning.statistics-is-awesome.org/different_strokes/

A little demo of the tool in action!